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FAQ:  Porcelain Veneers


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    Question:
    Veneers cause TMJ Pain?: I had veneers put on my front six teeth approximately 5 weeks ago.

    The procedure left my mouth sore for a few weeks and very sensitive. My dentist said that I would be fine within a few weeks time, and he prescribed me Motrin 800mg.

    After a few weeks, I began to experience pain in the right side of my face which lead up to UNBEARABLE pain. The muscles in my face are cramping uncontrollably from my jaw to the ear, down my neck and it's crippling.

    The doctor said my bite is fine, but the cramping is reoccuring and awful (I've had to miss work and school due to it.) ...Visitor from South Florida

    Answer:
    I am sorry to hear that you are experiencing so much discomfort. While it is possible for individuals to have some transient sensitivity issues, it is unusal to have the muscle pain that you are describing.

    I would have to agree with you that one must first rule out that there has not been some alteration of your bite. However, to do so when you are in pain, would be inaccurate.

    One must first deprogram your muscles to a relaxed state to evaluate your bite. The other possibility is that your TMJ and jaw muscles got out of balance from holding your mouth open during the dental procedure.

    It may be that the articular disc in your joint has been displaced and the condylar head of the joint can not get back into its' proper position. As a consequence the muscles are constantly active trying move your jaw into a comfortable position. Sort of like standing on one leg for a long time. Your muscles are working hard to hold you in balance.

    I would ask your dentist to refer you to someone who understands occlusion and neuromuscular dentistry. To tell you more would require an clinical evaluation. I hope this has helped you.

    Editorial Staff


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